• Sonia Gulwadi

Cinnamon


Cinnamon has been used all around the world since ancient times for both its warm spiced flavour, and its medicinal qualities.


Medicinal uses

Is a natural food preservative - anti fungal and antimicrobial properties

Stomach upset – flatulence, diarrhoea, cramps, & nausea

May reduce blood sugar levels

May reduce blood triglycerides and cholesterol

Avoid excessive consumption if pregnant, you have a cinnamon allergy or with ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract.


When can you use it in the kitchen?

Found on the bark of trees from the Cinnamomum species. The flavour is sweet, warm and woody.

In the kitchen cinnamon is a very versatile spice, it works well in both sweet and savoury dishes. Cinnamon can be purchased as quills or powdered, generally the ground cinnamon works better with sweet foods, and the quills with savoury but this rule is not set in stone.


Beverages

Chia

Warm milk and cinnamon

Hot chocolate with cinnamon

Golden latte

Iced tea

Smoothies and juices


Breakfast

Can be sprinkled over most cereal based breakfasts (porridge, granola, chia pudding, bircher muesli,)

Added to the egg mixture for French toast

Sprinkled onto pancakes

Breakfast muffins

Fruit tost


Savoury uses

Curries

Stews and braises

Bolognese


Sweets

Donuts

Custard

Puddings and cakes

Muffins and biscuits

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